Blue Snaggletooth Serpent and the King ESB

. October 5, 2015.

Ann Arbor rockers, Blue Snaggletooth, are unveiling a different kind of hit single this October. The band is releasing 22 oz. bottles of Blue Snaggletooth Serpent and the King ESB from Oliver Brewing Company, a Baltimore brew house.

There will be a tasting party on October 10th where you can try out the brew. The party is at Vault Ultralounge on Main Street, and costs just $5 to attend. Very small quantities were brewed and only 20 bottles are available at the tasting. The cover gets you a cup of Snaggletooth ESB and pizza and it is first come, first served. The first 20 paying guests will get an empty bottle as a souvenir. Only ten bottles will be for sale, they are $25 each and come with some band merch.

The event will have original Blue Snaggletooth artwork from Jeremy Wheeler on display as well as a preview of four new recordings. After the tasting there will be a screening of one of the band’s favorite films, Fire and Ice.

Saturday, October 10 | 9 PM
Vault Ultralounge, 219 Main St. Ann Arbor
www.facebook.com/events/1491509894497593/

Trending

Heather Mae Says ‘You’re Not Alone’ at Singing OUT!

Social justice songwriters Heather Mae and Crys Matthews take their 2020 tour online. Here’s one way to stay positive during these trying times.

Coolest Places To Fill Your Growler (While Supporting Local Breweries)

One of the things Michigan is most known for is our breweries. And nothing beats the delicious taste of a cool beer from one of our favorite breweries. With the addition of growlers, we can enjoy our favorite beers from our favorite local breweries from the comfort of our own home. We live in a

Project 206 continues to push the limits of jazz with new ‘Volatile’ EP

Project 206 masterfully melds freak-out jazz sensibilities with progressive rock tendencies on their instrumental, four-track sophomore EP, Volatile.

Venue Spotlight Series: The Ark

All live music venues are vital. That’s our starting point for this series. The stories we’re sharing here demonstrate that local establishments hosting performances by local musicians should never be taken for granted— particularly in a post-pandemic world.  When it comes to the Ark, you could argue that there’s been a dedicated constituency that has