Ante up for art

. September 28, 2012.
MILLAGE-COVER

City council unanimously voted to put a  .1% mil tax on the November 6 ballot that would change the method of funding for public art. According to the Ann Arbor Public Art Commission (AAPAC), the governing body which gives final approval for public art works, the millage will garner around $450,000 annually and only be in place from 2013-2016. Basically, the millage will replace the city’s current Percent for Art program, and provide more flexibility for the AAPAC to commission public works. Under the Percent for Art program stipulations projects must be permanent and located on public land. These requirements will prevent the use of options such as performance art and temporary installations. Many individuals and organizations in the arts community including the Arts Alliance have expressed support for the millage. If the millage does not pass, then the Percent for Art program will remain. There are several projects either in development or under construction through the current program. Notable projects nearly completed are Dreiseitl sculpture project in front of City Hall, and the shelter mural project at Allmendinger Park. For more information on the millage and current and future AAPAC projects visit www.ci.ann-arbor.mi.us. —JG

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