Style Sense

. June 30, 2014.

Tommy Vanicelli
Hair Stylist, So F/N Pretty Salon

On the second floor of an otherwise undistinguished Washington Street office building, down the hall and through the third door on the right, there is a man with a thick beard, a lot of tattoos, and a pair of shears. When Tommy Vanicelli, the sole owner of the So F/N Pretty hair salon, sat me in his old-style barber chair facing away from the salon mirror you typically face when getting your hair done, I had some reservations. But before long Tommy’s endearing charm and effortlessly personable style set me at ease. It’s easy to see how, despite not being affiliated with a multi-chair hair salon, the man with the beard and shears has been able to secure himself a long list of loyal clients.

Do you consider yourself an artist?

Yes I am a hair artist. I create my own colors and cuts to make unique one-of-a-kind looks!

Have you ever had to break up with a client?

I am very close with my clients. No I have never had to break up with a client. I am a patient and understanding man and there’s always a way to find a solution to any hair issue.

What’s the most extreme fix-it you’ve had to do?

I can’t put a bean on any one extreme fix it because there have been many, but I have doubled my clientele based on fix-its. I strive to do what others can’t do, and restore faith in those clients who have been afflicted with bad hair.

If you were not doing hair, what would you be doing?

I don’t know what else I would be doing. I love my job and wouldn’t change it for the world. I mean it fulfills all aspects of what I love in life. I get to create my own personal, moveable artwork. I make people happy. I’m my own boss. Oh, and being around gorgeous women doesn’t hurt at all.

Where do you see your business in 10 years?

In 10 years I see myself still rocking hair and taking names, while teaching young, upcoming stylists the art of hair.

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