That which we call Washtenaw Count

. July 31, 2012.
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By any other name would Washtenaw County be as sweet? The Washtenaw County Historical Society is inviting the public to explore the history behind the names of local streets and roads to discover the events and people who helped define the county’s cities, villages and townships with their latest exhibit, "What’s in a Name? Streets, Roads & Stories of Washtenaw County.” The artifacts in the collection at The Museum on Main Street cover the life of the county’s earliest settlers. Items on display range from arrowheads to jewelry, with many old photographs and maps to give visitors a glimpse of how the area was founded. People are also encouraged to download A Step Back in Time — A Walking Tour of Historic Ann Arbor  as a companion to the exhibit. The podcast can be downloaded and takes the listener on a historical journey to some of A2’s most influential locations. What's in a name? runs through September 10. For more info, or to download the walking tour,  visit the website. The Museum on Main Street, 500 North Main. 734-662-9092. www.washtenawhistory.org

 

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