Fiction Reading: Detroit’s Kelly Fordon

. July 31, 2015.
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Prior to writing fiction and poetry, Kelly Fordon worked at the NPR member station in Detroit and for National Geographic magazine. Her fiction, poetry, and book reviews have appeared in The Boston Review, The Florida Review, Flashquake, and The Kenyon Review. She is the author of two poetry chapbooks, On the Street Where We Live, which won the 2011 Standing Rock Chapbook Contest, and Tell Me When It Starts to Hurt (Kattywompus Press, 2013). She received her MFA in fiction writing from Queens University of Charlotte and works for InsideOut Literary Arts in Detroit as a writer-in-residence. Her latest release, Garden for the Blind (Wayne State University Press, 2015), visits suburban and working-class homes, hidden sanctuaries and dangerous neighborhoods, illustrating the connections between settings and relationships and the strange motivations that keep us moving forward.

Literati Bookstore, 7pm, Wednesday, August 26, 124 E. Washington, Ann Arbor.
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