Lisa Reyerse

. December 23, 2013.

Lisa may look like the girl next door, but her wardrobe suggests otherwise. She’s bubbly and fun to chat with, but also very decisive and serious about her preferences in fashion and style. She works by day to create the brand identity for one of the country’s foremost art institutions, and her clothes indicate that she also has a very strong brand of her own. Lisa’s spatial intelligence helps her pair unexpected garments together. She mixes eras and materials that transport her back to specific points in her own life history. When you see Lisa, odds are, she can tell you a specific story about everything she’s wearing!
 
You are a graphic designer by trade. Does this influence the way you put outfits together?

I think my profession has trained my eye to find a simple connection. Whether it it’s color, texture, pattern, etc. I think it also trained me to always carry or wear one thing that really pops. Mixing intensities is something that I like to carry throughout my work and my wardrobe.

What is the most daring ensemble you’ve ever worn to work?

I try not to get too inspired with my wardrobe when I’m in the office. I think just wearing high-waisted pants throw my coworkers off.
 
Where do you typically shop for original items?

I tend to travel a lot and I make it a goal on my travels to try to find at least one signature item while I’m out and about. Recently, I took a spontaneous trip to Vermont via NYC. On the way back, random travel mishaps led me to a town called Cold Spring. There, I found the most amazing vintage shop and scored an amazing alligator clutch.

What fashion crime do you often find yourself committing?

My most consistent fashion crime has to do with socks. I think socks are an underestimated accessory. I like to wear patterned socks with cute wedges or wooden clogs. Some people can’t handle it. I say, “Why not?! It’s frickin’ cold out!”

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