Weekly What’s Up: Chris Bathgate and The Go Rounds

. March 17, 2015.
10329205_836236963061736_4391293743159393144_n

Chris Bathgate is back and he’s been quite busy. The meditative and at times melancholy singer/songwriter will forever be claimed by the Ann Arbor (and SE Michigan) music scene from whence he broke out in the mid-2000s, garnering acclaim from NPR, The A.V. Club and recording memorable sets for the Tiny Desk series and Daytrotter, not to mention capping off a handful of Mittenfest’s with his sublime serenades.

Bathgate has spent the last seven months touring with the remarkable Molly Sullivan, a Cincinnati-based singer/songwriter and essentially kindred spirit to Bathgate’s style of breathtaking, twilight-folk centering on vocal melody while balancing electric and acoustic elements.

With a new album coming out in May, The Go Rounds, meanwhile, are comparably busy. The Kalamazoo based Americana/rock outfit is joining Bathgate for a few tour dates this month, leading into an East Coast tour next month.

The group found a new sonic stride and enticing blend of psychedelic-warble, smooth surf-tones and alt-country twang on last year’s release, Some Other Time.

Bathgate and The Go Rounds are joined by a Brooklyn/Toledo trio called The Antivillians, blending lo-fi indie pop with rootsy waltzes.

And you can catch them all Wednesday night at PJ’s Lager House in Detroit (1254 Michgian Ave)

Trending

Helen Gotlib

A visit to the artist’s studio and her “Secret Beaches”

The Go Rounds Find Stability Through Change

A conversation with singer/guitarist Graham Parsons about a brand new album Singer/songwriter Graham Parsons founded this band a decade ago. A time period that represents a third of his life, reinforced by a resiliency brought by his bandmates. Guitarist Mike Savina, bassist Drew Tyner and drummer Adam Danis (the latter has been a member since

Amadeus Can Sing with Central European Flavor

Three decades later, the Viennese-style café ethos continues in Downtown Ann Arbor

Class struggle is at the heart of Jordan Peele’s new horror film

In his dark mirror, there is nothing more frightening than “Us” Jordan Peele’s long-awaited film “Us” is finally here, and while it may engender polarized audience responses, it solidifies Peele as a masterful writer-director with his own distinctive voice. “Us” begins in 1986 with a young Adelaide watching TV. We know it’s 1986 because an