A Music-filled Future in Sight for Blind Pig

. December 7, 2017.
photo credit: a2 photographics
photo credit: a2 photographics

This year began ominously with the February announcement the property that included the Blind Pig was listed for sale by local real estate company Swisher Commercial.

Many feared the worst – that whenever a purchase was actually agreed upon, the music/arts community would be at risk of losing an integral live venue. The Blind Pig is a linchpin in that regard, really, considering its size, programming, longevity, and notoriety.

Those fears were quelled this week when Joe Malcoun and a group of local investors purchased the property at 208 S. First St (including its accompanying businesses) and promptly made it clear the Blind Pig would remain a home for live music events for the foreseeable future.

Follow The Blind Pig via Facebook for more information and updates.

Malcoun is CEO of Ann Arbor based Nutshell, developer of CRM (Customer Relationship Management) systems for small businesses, and he assured local news outlets that despite concerns from earlier in the year, the Blind Pig would not, in fact, be turned into condominiums.

Malcoun and this investment team of local business leaders, U-M alumni, and community members, are dedicated not only to keeping the Blind Pig alive, but also to reinvigorating it with a new sound system and more shows scheduled each week.

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