January 30 2013

. January 31, 2013.
Weird_Al

Family Farms

It's not a big secret that, for years, factory farms have been attempting to monopolize the food production market, with the goal of pushing family farms out of business — or, at the very least, making them think twice about expanding and competing. It's too cutthroat. The supply and demand is out of whack. And factory farms cut corners — keeping animals in cages, pumping them up with steroids and other hormones — that an honest farmer would never imagine, because of a sense of loyalty to the consumer. But, here, NPR puts an interesting spin on the story, analyzing the business plan of the average family farm and how they can survive the future by being more savvy.

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Creepy Crafts

Who doesn't like music memorabilia? But, now, with the Internet, we are fully aware of how obsessive and strange people can get. The music blog Stereogum created a new feature on odd crafts dedicated to musicians on the web. The latest is, fittingly, the 10 weirdest creations revolving around Prince.

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Weird Al Being Weird

This is the time of year us music junkies speculate on and spend way too much time thinking about who is going to perform at the major music festivals. Today Bonnaroo leaked, via a pretty creepy video, that Weird Al will be announcing the line-up in a YouTube video.

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Helen Gotlib

A visit to the artist’s studio and her “Secret Beaches”

The Go Rounds Find Stability Through Change

A conversation with singer/guitarist Graham Parsons about a brand new album Singer/songwriter Graham Parsons founded this band a decade ago. A time period that represents a third of his life, reinforced by a resiliency brought by his bandmates. Guitarist Mike Savina, bassist Drew Tyner and drummer Adam Danis (the latter has been a member since

Amadeus Can Sing with Central European Flavor

Three decades later, the Viennese-style café ethos continues in Downtown Ann Arbor

Class struggle is at the heart of Jordan Peele’s new horror film

In his dark mirror, there is nothing more frightening than “Us” Jordan Peele’s long-awaited film “Us” is finally here, and while it may engender polarized audience responses, it solidifies Peele as a masterful writer-director with his own distinctive voice. “Us” begins in 1986 with a young Adelaide watching TV. We know it’s 1986 because an