Brisbo Named Executive Director Of Marijuana Regulatory Agency

. June 1, 2019.

The State Senate named Andrew Brisbo the Executive Director of the Marijuana Regulatory Agency, formerly the Bureau of Marijuana Regulation, after a Senate confirmation hearing on May 2nd. Brisbo is not new to marijuana regulation: he led the State’s efforts to develop rules to enforce the 2016 law legalizing medical marijuana. Brisbo and his staff of 102 have now been charged with the difficult task of regulating recreational marijuana. Among the many challenges he will face is how the medical marijuana program will work together with the recreational program, and how to create an effective and streamlined process for business licensing.

Regulation and legal uncertainties

Cannabis dispensaries have struggled to accompany the regulations and standards imposed by legalization. Many businesses that do not have the capital to pay for licensing and upgrade their product to meet the new standards have been forced to close their doors, leading their patrons to travel to one of the fewer dispensaries that are still operational or to buy marijuana on the black market. Cannabis industry leaders have brought cases before the courts challenging those regulations, claiming the compliance deadlines were unrealistic. Some dispensaries continue to operate without licenses as these cases work their way through the courts. House Bill 4440 is now before the Senate and would amend the Medical Marijuana Facilities Licensing Act (MMFLA) to add operating a marijuana facility without a license to the list of circumstances that make an applicant ineligible for a license.

Powerful influence over shape of new market

Brisbo will have a lot of discretion over the shaping of the cannabis market and how the law is enforced, as state lawmakers must have a two thirds majority to make any changes to the law. He has been scrupulous in his unwillingness to discuss his personal views on legalization, but he has the confidence of Governor Gretchen Whitmer, who seems much more eager than her predecessor to move forward with the process of legalization. While his personal views may not be known, his belief in strong guidance from the State is evident in his recent decision to no longer allow caregivers to provide medical marijuana directly to dispensaries, instead allowing only licensed growers to supply products which are extensively tested before sale. Growers have not yet had the time to respond to the new regulations, and there is currently a shortage of state-approved marijuana on the market. Until they can catch up, caregivers are still permitted to sell marijuana to licensed growers, provided it meets the same purity standards.

Trending

Casablanca: Comfortable, Down-To-Earth Moroccan Cuisine

Casablanca, on Washtenaw, close to Downtown Ypsilanti, has a comfortable, down-to-earth atmosphere, hiding it’s 35-year-ago provenance as a Taco Bell. The manager/owner, Mohammad Mohammad, is hands-on, ensuring satisfaction for each customer, assuring that each dish placed on the table is properly presented. The abundant natural light from ample windows gives the dining area a warm,

Cullen Washington, Jr.’s Meditations On Interconnectedness, Vivility, Democracy And Inclusion

In Ancient Greece, the agora was a central public space, meaning “gathering place” or “assembly.” The agora served as a political, commercial and social hub and was also where Socrates found himself in trouble because of his philosophical inquisitions. In The Public Square, an exhibit on view at the University of Michigan Museum of Art

Third Monk Brewery: Empowering Local Performers With Licensing Agreements

Jeff Robinson can hear the music of the brew. After working as an audio engineer for nearly 30 years, the owner of South Lyon’s Third Monk Brewing doesn’t see that career as dissimilar: “…malt is the bass,” he says, “and hops are the treble, and the yeast is the mastering. I can take components of

Courtroom installation explores what is fair and equitable in the legal system

We human beings are a storytelling species. Our social institutions— religious, legal and cultural— are based on narratives that may be fanciful or fact-based or influenced by precedent. But they are also ever-evolving. Throughout the winter and spring of 2020, Courtney McClellan, this year’s Roman J. Witt Artist in Residence at the University of Michigan