Q+A with Laith Al-Saadi

. June 1, 2016.

Current: What do you miss most about Ann Arbor? 

​Laith Al-Saadi: I miss the people, my friends and family. I’m a huge foodie so I miss my Zingerman’s and Casey’s Tavern. 

What are some of your favorite places to play in town?  

Ann Arbor really doesn’t have many venues with stages. They’ve been dwindling since I started playing. I really enjoyed playing regularly at Weber’s. I of course enjoy playing at the Blind Pig, although I don’t do so very often. 

Who are some local musicians you’re into? 

We have world class musicians in Ann Arbor. We have Paul Keller who plays with jazz greats around the world, Rick Roe, the Macpodz. I like George Bedard and the Kingpins, they are the townie band. George is a great 50s rockabilly guitar player. 

Are you excited about coming back to play Sonic Lunch this month?

I’m really excited to get back home. This is my 9th Sonic Lunch in a row, one year I did two. I think it’s a great series, I’m so proud of having it in my hometown. It’s great that the Bank of Ann Arbor does it, of course kudos to Matthew Altruda for giving everyone a free concert series with great music. 

Anything else that you want to add about Ann Arbor?  

Ann Arbor is absolutely home. I’m incredibly proud to be from there and have stuck around because I love it more than any other place I’ve been. We have the best of all worlds. It’s a beautiful, safe city and we have all of the advantages culturally of big cities. We have intelligent people and a progressive, liberal city that has been the first in many things. There are so many things about Ann Arbor that I’m proud to represent. 

So we shouldn’t expect you to pack your bags and head to Hollywood for good?

I really think I would have done that a long time ago if that’s what I wanted to do. My career might necessitate a move, but my goal is to stay in Ann Arbor. We have something special, it’s a part of who I am as a person, I don’t want to water that down. I want to contribute to the scene that supported me and make sure that the level of entertainment that we have around is good. 

Laith Al-Saadi at Bank of Ann Arbor’s Sonic Lunch
Liberty Plaza | 255 E. Liberty St. 
Thursday | June 9 | Noon |
soniclunch.com

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