Before and After: How Ann Arbor Street Views Have Changed Over the Past 10 Years

. August 10, 2016.
Ann Arbor Real Estate Development over the years
Courtesy: RENTCafé

It’s no secret that Ann Arbor is an attractive prospect for real estate developers looking to build everything from apartments to athletic facilities (e.g. the $200+ million football stadium renovation). Nowadays, it’s definitely not uncommon to hear townies talk about how much the city has changed over the years, but it may be tough to picture what the place looked like beforehand if you’re new to town.

Luckily the folks at RENTCafé have conveniently put this urban landscape evolution into visual perspective using Google Street View. Swipe across the images below to see how recent building developments have changed our city. For more background, read RENTCafé’s full story.

Zaragon Place

619 E. University

C.S. Mott Children’s & Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital

1540 E. Hospital Dr.

Zaragon West

401 Thompson St. 

Varsity Ann Arbor & Sterling 411 Lofts

411 E. Washington St.

North Quadrangle Residential and Academic Complex

105 S. State St. 

Michigan Stadium

1201 S. Main St. 

Landmark Apartments

1300 S. University Ave.

618 South Main

Ann Arbor City Apartments

201 S. 1st St.

Trending

Helen Gotlib

A visit to the artist’s studio and her “Secret Beaches”

The Go Rounds Find Stability Through Change

A conversation with singer/guitarist Graham Parsons about a brand new album Singer/songwriter Graham Parsons founded this band a decade ago. A time period that represents a third of his life, reinforced by a resiliency brought by his bandmates. Guitarist Mike Savina, bassist Drew Tyner and drummer Adam Danis (the latter has been a member since

Amadeus Can Sing with Central European Flavor

Three decades later, the Viennese-style café ethos continues in Downtown Ann Arbor

Class struggle is at the heart of Jordan Peele’s new horror film

In his dark mirror, there is nothing more frightening than “Us” Jordan Peele’s long-awaited film “Us” is finally here, and while it may engender polarized audience responses, it solidifies Peele as a masterful writer-director with his own distinctive voice. “Us” begins in 1986 with a young Adelaide watching TV. We know it’s 1986 because an