Protomartyr to bring dirty brand of post-punk to the Blind Pig

. March 31, 2017.

Delve into the darker side of rock-and-roll with post-punks Protomartyr April 17 at Ann Arbor’s Blind Pig.

This Detroit-based band is a gritty and darkly ambient four piece that pumps out groove-laden rock-and-roll. Packed with technicality, Protomartyr’s punk roots shine through with heavy distortion and the baritone rasps of singer Joe Casey. Slightly rough around the edges, this band delivers technicality without loosing the renowned rawness of the Motor City music scene.

Equal parts Queens of the Stone Age and Joy Division, Protomartyr is a must-see for anyone wanting to indulge in a little bit of thoughtful noise.
Protomartyr’s third and most recent full length, ‘The Agent Intellect,’ released in 2015 on Hardly Art Records. They’ll be joined on stage at the Blind Pig by Paint Thinner and Double Winter. With The Blind Pig now up for sale, there’s no time like the present to catch some live music at this venue.

Protomartyr w/ Paint Thinner and Double Winter
Saturday, April 17 | 9 p.m. | 18+ | $15
The Blind Pig | 208 1st St.
734-996-8555 | blindpigmusic.com

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