Washtenaw County NORML making local cannabis activism accessible

. March 31, 2017.

The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, better known as NORML, has been working to move the United States towards cannabis legalization since the 1970s. The organization has grown to have hundreds of local chapters and a legal committee of 350 criminal defense attorneys who specialize in cannabis related offenses. Michigan with 12 county chapters listed on it’s website, has recently added a 13th, Washtenaw County. ‘

Launched in August of 2016, the local chapter is just 7 months old. Eric Babalis, Executive Director of Washtenaw County NORML, explained the group’s mission to “represent citizens, patients, and businesses in spreading sensible reform within Washtenaw and beyond.”

The group holds monthly meetings and has grown to eight members since their inception. They are active on social media (@WashCoNORML), posting updates on local and national news and events. The group is excited to participate in the campaign to legalize cannabis in Michigan in 2018. Babalis called the ballot initiative “the most comprehensive, small business friendly initiative in the country.”

You can donate to the cause on the Washtenaw County NORML Facebook page and find info on upcoming meeting and events.

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