Bygone Era: Detroit before the automobile

. October 1, 2014.
detroit

It’s hard to remember that Detroit hasn’t always been known as The Motor City. The University of Michigan Museum of Art’s exhibition “Detroit before the Automobile” reminds us of what the area once was, providing evidence of a bygone, more pastoral era in the form of maps, letters, books, prints, and photos from The William L. Clements Library Collection. From October 18, 2014 – January 18, 2015 original resources will illustrate Detroit’s transformation from a French outpost to a manufacturing powerhouse at the end of the 19th century. Part of the UMMA’s Collections Collaborations series, the show is supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-organized by the UMMA.

Admission is free, but a $5 donation is suggested to further support UMMA. Tuesday through Saturday, 11-5 pm. 

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