Food Review: The Bomber in Ypsi

. December 29, 2016.
The famous Bomber Breakfast fills up bellies with a hearty start to the day.
The famous Bomber Breakfast fills up bellies with a hearty start to the day.

One of the things I love most about living smack dab in the middle of Ypsi and Ann Arbor is that I get to enjoy the best of both worlds – especially when it comes to an eclectic array of restaurants serving up great food.

Ypsilanti has a cultural and historical heritage that must be remembered and cherished. It’s a pioneering, rebellious town with a taste for both the quick-fix fulfillment of Midwestern comfort food or the spicy and sweet ethnic cuisine of an ever-evolving American identity, Ypsi – as we locals call it, has it all. And, generally speaking, I’ve found that it has a sympathetic spot for your wallet when wanting to try something tasty on a budget.

Back In Time

The Bomber Restaurant, one of my favorites, prevails for comfort food, situated on Michigan Avenue, the ultimate, historic drive stretching from Detroit to Chicago.
The Bomber Restaurant name recalls for bygone days of the B-24 bombers that were made during World War II at the nearby Willow Run bomber plant. The Bomber originally opened its doors as Baldwin’s Diner in 1936 and after a bit of name-changing throughout the decades, owners John Sebestyen and Johanna McCoy who purchased the diner in 1995, The Bomber, is the name for this dignified diner, once again.

Leave Your Hunger Behind

Open from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily, the Bomber is known for its menu of go-to, comfort-food, home-town cooking, filled with straight-forward, hearty breakfasts, unpretentious appetizers and simple, delicious classic sandwiches that have customers coming back.

The Bomber Breakfast

I stopped by on a busy Sunday, waited patiently in a fast-moving line that stretched out the door, and was surrounded by a diverse group of customers, young and old: Eastern Michigan University students, retirees, Millennials, Generation x’ers and Baby Boomers – all together in one, happy and hungry group.

Once seated, coffee (good old fashioned “drip” coffee ONLY, here, ladies and gentlemen) was served. I ordered the “Bomber Breakfast”— the diner’s signature that comes with four eggs, a choice of ham, bacon, or sausage and includes breakfast potatoes and toast. And quicker than I could count all of the replica model airplanes, scan the historic WWI photos, posters, memorabilia and other pieces of Americana that supplement the diner’s historical theme, my table was full with food that looked, smelled and tasted delicious. Thick pancakes that melt in your mouth, sunny-side-up eggs, and hash browns that could convert this non-hash brown-eating dieter into a bona fide Sunday regular.

“Cap’nCrunch French Toast”

“Cap’nCrunch French Toast”

A true trip into the past at a price that doesn’t take your whole wallet and leaves you sweetly satiated, the Bomber Restaurant is my new favorite place to grab a bite to eat with family, friends and colleagues. Knowing that we don’t have to pretend to be anything other than our true, down-to-earth selves and enjoy the reminiscent view.

The Bomber Restaurant
306 E. Michigan Ave. Ypsilanti, MI
(734) 482-0550 | bomberrestaurant.net

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