The Future

. July 1, 2015.
mcity_callouts

It’s the year 2021. Nanotechnology has extended average life expectancies by 10 years. Asteroid mining is a billion dollar industry. Solar powered energy systems have replaced conventional energy sources. Everyone has cool new phones. And in Ann Arbor, a fleet of 9,000 autonomous vehicles cruise the streets moving people and goods from A to B. But there’s a lot to do between now and then.  

On July 20, the University of Michigan Mobility Transportation Center will formally roll out their futuristic automated vehicle testing facility called Mcity. Occupying 32 acres at the University’s North Campus Research Complex, Mcity simulates a range of complex urban and suburban driving environments, including roads with intersections, traffic signs and signals, sidewalks, simulated buildings, streetlights, and even the ubiquitous construction barriers that line the roadways throughout the better part of the year. “Connected and automated vehicle technology will usher in a revolution in the mobility of people and goods comparable to that sparked by the introduction of the automobile a century ago,” said Peter Sweatman, director of U-M’s Mobility Transformation Center. “Mcity will allow us to test new approaches in a safe, controlled and realistic environment before we implement them on actual streets.”

More information at mtc.umich.edu.  

Trending

Local Band Plays Releases Their Own Version of What Happened?

After Hours Radio Plays Blind Pig on September 30th

Ann Arbor Summer Festival Artist Wishlist

Help Choose the Bands for 2018 Ann Arbor Summer Festival

Ann Arbor Art Center Opens In Transit Exhibition

The exhibition opens with a free public kick-off event on September 15th, and will highlight mobility and transportation infrastructure

REVIEW: Gregg Allman’s Doleful Final Album Southern Blood

Posthumous albums sometimes land with such a proximity to the particular artist’s passing that, like humans’ ability to see light from burnt-out stars, it’s often difficult to recognize the long-flickering light’s transience, much less accept it.  Paralleling this phenomenon, Gregg Allman’s final album, Southern Blood, is a sonically robust collection of orchestral folk-rock driven by twangy