Rebellious artists return to Detroit

. March 1, 2015.
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Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo shared passions for art, communism, and each other. And the couple’s intensity of beliefs and rebellious nature flourishes in their artwork. Although he ruffled some feathers during a visit in 1932 with his Marxist philosophical beliefs, Diego fell in love with Detroit. He painted 47 Detroit Industry murals, two of which are displayed at the DIA today, the largest recreating the working scene at the Ford River Rouge Complex in Dearborn Michigan. Providing a rare glimpse into his creative process, the Museum’s new exhibit will feature the preparation sketches and drawings he did before painting the murals. Nearly two dozen of Kahlo’s surrealist self-portraits are also displayed as part of the exhibit.

March 15 – July 12. Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200 Woodward Ave. 313-833-7900. dia.org.

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