Powwow

. April 1, 2016.
pow-wow-color-2-2

Started in 1972 by the group American Indians at the University of Michigan (AIUM) before the Native American Student Association (NASA) came formed in 1976, the 44th Annual Dance for Mother Earth Powwow brings together Native American groups from across the Great Lakes region. There will be demonstrations of different styles of Native American dance, including Women’s Jingle Dress, Women’s Fancy Shawl, Women’s Traditional, Men’s Grass Dance, Men’s Fancy Dance and Men’s Traditional, as well as drum circles and dance contests. The powwow will host a market, where some of the region’s finest Native American artisans will sell traditional and modern work. In addition to learning about Native American culture and heritage, visitors will have the opportunity to join the dance circle alongside competing dancers. Weekend and family passes are available at a discounted rate.

 

10:30am-10:30pm/Saturday, April 2 and 10:30am-6pm/Sunday, April 3.
$10/general admission, $7/students with ID and seniors, $5/children 6-12.
Skyline High School | 2552 N. Maple Rd.
powwow.umich.ed

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