Michigan knows mushrooms

. May 1, 2015.
mushroomhunt

Morel season is here—as if we really needed a reason to get out and enjoy the warmer air. Between Boyne City’s annual morel mushroom festival, May 14-17, and Mesick’s morel fest, May 8-10—both festivals are attended by morel enthusiasts from all over the world—Michigan is a premier location for one of nature’s most prized fungi. And Washtenaw County plays host, too. But you have to know what you’re looking for. In the early spring, when the daytime highs reach 60 degrees and the lows don’t dip below 40, morels start to pop out on south facing slopes in open areas at the forest’s edge. Look for ash, aspen, and old oak trees. Dead and decaying trees also make for prime hunting grounds. As the season progresses, you’ll have to venture further into the woods to north facing slopes where you’ll find bigger, yellow morels. To cleanse your bounty, soak in cold water. Halve and saute in butter. Perhaps toss in with shallots and fresh asparagus, farfalle and pecorino. False morels exist, so do some identification research before the forage. Good luck and bon appetit. 

Trending

The revival of the legendary Ann Arbor Blues Festival

We recently chatted with James Partridge from the Ann Arbor Blues Society about the upcoming revival of the legendary Ann Arbor Blues Festival on August 19

Biz Buzz: July 2017

Updates in Washtenaw County business

Charcoal for gardening? The Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living will teach you all about it

Biochar, a highly porous form of charcoal that has been enriching gardens for thousands of years, has recently re-emerged as a soil amendment, similar to mulch and compost

Ann Arbor bookstore owners win 2017 recognition

The Kerrytown BookFest has named Robin and Jamie Agnew, owners of Aunt Agatha’s Mystery Bookstore, as the winners of the 2017 Community Book Award