Current Forecast: New Sounds in Town This Week

. October 11, 2016.
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Welcome back to the Current Forecast playlist! Every Tuesday Current Magazine is putting together a playlist of the live music acts coming to town over the next week.

After a slow week last week it’s nice to see some really exciting shows coming to Washtenaw County over the next several days. Bluesy rock band The Record Company kick things off tonight at The Blind Pig, which should be a great show for fans of solid and smooth rock music.  On Wednesday the 12th Shiro Schwarz will be performing at Club Above.  This band plays funky and poppy electronic music with an intense audio-visual accompaniment and is perfect for fans of a truly original experience.  Thursday the 13th David Bazan is playing in Ann Arbor as part of his Midwest Living Room Tour.  Bazan played for years under the name Pedro the Lion, and his new album under his own name finds him embracing electronic sounds more, yet not shying away from his signature songwriting ability.  Electronic funk jam band Broccoli Samurai is performing at the Blind Pig on Friday the 14th.  Also on the 14th, The Verve Pipe will be performing their classic album Villains in its entirety at The Ark.  This performance is being performed acoustically and is being recorded to be released at a later date.  Finally, closing out the week on Saturday the 15th is indie folk band Darlingside, who will be performing beautiful and catchy folk music at The Ark.

Make sure to check back next week to see who is coming to town!

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