Big Bad Voodoo Daddy

. October 1, 2013.
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Swing masterminds Big Bad Voodoo Daddy got its name after founder Scotty Morris met blues guitarist Albert Collins, who signed Morris’s poster ‘To Scotty, the big bad voodoo daddy.’ The rest is history: Morris and his band have played their contemporary version of 1940s and 50s swing across the U.S. for the last 25 years. On Sunday, October 13, the jazz-blues-and-swing combo will play the Ark featuring Morris’s lead guitar and vocals alongside a rhythm section, piano player and full horn section. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy is one of the most originally funky bands of the 90s. Outside of their 8 full-length albums, they also recorded the opening theme for the sitcom 3rd Rock from the Sun and contributed to the soundtrack of the 1996 comedy ‘Swingers.’ Their newest release ‘Rattle Them Bones’ continues their swinging legacy—get ready to boogie A2.

7pm. $35. The Ark, 316 S. Main St. 734-761-1800. the ark.

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