Whiskey Season

. November 1, 2014.
bourbon

As the warm weather recedes, so does the idea of washing down a long day with an ice cold beer or tropical mixer. Cue bourbon: that cold-weather spirit that keeps you feeling toasty on those hoary November nights. Enhance your appreciation of bourbon and increase your knowledge of Kentucky whiskey products at The Filson Bourbon Academy. This six-hour course is supported by the Kentucky Distillers Association and The Ravens Club. Filson Bourbon historian Mike Veach, a member of the Bourbon Hall of Fame and author of Kentucky Bourbon History: An American Heritage leads the event.

The Academy is limited to 50 students. $125 for the day-long session and box lunch. Reservations required. (502) 635-5083. filsonhistorical.org. Saturday, November 15, The Ravens Club, 202 S. Main Street, Ann Arbor. (734) 214-0400. 

The Bourbon Basics Cocktail Class at Zingerman’s Cornman Farms in Dexter teaches participants how to make three classic bourbon cocktails: the Mint Julep, the Old Fashioned and the Boulevardier. Did you know bourbon was deemed America’s National Liquor by Congress in 1964? Attendees will also learn about the distillery process and what makes bourbon unique from other types of whiskey.

$60. Monday, November 10, from 7pm to 9:30pm, 8540 Island Lake Rd. Dexter, 734-619-8100.

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