Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Ann Arbor Restaurants Team Up

. October 10, 2016.
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Ann Arbor restaurants are joining forces for Breast Cancer Awareness Month and launching “Think Pink Go Blue”. Each participating business will have “Think Pink” items on the menu.  The proceeds will benefit the Breast Care Center at the University of Michigan.

We have taken the liberty to choose a few “Think Pink” items to share. The majority of the specialty items are food and drinks, but a few non-food businesses are participating as well. Get out there and have a good time for a good cause.

Good Time Charley’s

Think Pink Fishbowl: Bacardi Dragonberry, blueberry vodka, strawberry liqueur, pineapple juice, and sprite, with a pink ribbon. $1 from each drink sold will be donated.

Cantina

Frozen Strawberry Margarita: It’s tart and sweet and pink. $1 from the sale of this classic will be donated.

Pizza House

Think Pink Shake: Any shake with any topping is eligible, just mention Think Pink when placing order. A percentage of every sale will be donated.

Frita Batidos

Think Pink Go Blue Pisco Hibiscus Lemonade. 50% of sales are donated! This lemonade pairs well with their classic fritas.

Pretzel Bell

  1. Think Pink Pretzel: soft baked pretzel with warm cheese dip and honey mustard sauce.
  2. Downtown Cosmo: lime-infused Tito’s vodka, citrus shrub, cranberry and soda.

15% of every sale will be donated.

For a full list of participating businesses and their Think Pink items: http://www.mcancer.org/breast-cancer/breast-cancer-center/think-pink-go-blue.

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