Fall Flavor: Ann Arbor Mixologist Shares Recipe for Refreshment

. October 1, 2016.
Good-drink

If summer is all about fresh, fruity flavors — light beer, sangria, and whatever else keeps the palette cool — then fall is about embracing the changing weather. As the leaves turn, so do the spirits, to rums, whiskeys, and ciders taking center stage.

We asked Tammy Coxen, mixologist and owner/operator of Tammy’s Tastings, which provides cocktail classes and food workshops across Southeast Michigan, including at The Last Word in Ann Arbor, to share one of her original recipes, a drink she conjured up through experimentation.

“It’s a great cocktail for fall and it’s really flexible,” Tammy said. “Like many of my favorite recipes, it’s not a strict format, but rather more of a template. So depending on what you have available, you can substitute bourbon for whiskey or rum or some other dark spirit. You can really customize it and make it your own.”

pour

The Autumnal

  • 1 1/2 oz Bourbon
  • 1/2 oz Benedictine
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 2 oz apple cider
  • 2-3 dashes Bittercube Blackstrap bitters
  • Garnish: flamed orange peel

Combine ingredients in shaker with ice. Shake well strain into cocktail glass (coupe or martini) or serve on the rocks as desired. Garnish.

Tammy’s Tasting:
Cider Season class | Monday | October 17 | 7:30pm
at The Last Word | 301 W. Huron St. | $45
tammystastings.com

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